Lisp Programming Language Profile

Lisp

Lisp (derives from “LISt Processing”) is one of the oldest programming languages. It was invented in 1958, with the language being conceived by John McCarthy and is based on his paper “Recursive Functions of Symbolic Expressions and Their Computation by Machine”. Over the years, Lisp has evolved into a family of programming languages. The most commonly used general-purpose dialects are Common Lisp and Scheme. Other dialects include Franz Lisp, Interlisp, Portable Standard Lisp, XLISP and Zetalisp.

The majority of Lisp implementations offer a lot more than simply a programming language. They include an entire environment such as debuggers, inspectors, tracing, and other tools to add the Lisp developer. Lisp is a practical, expression-oriented, interactive programming language which uses linked lists as one of its major data structures. A Lisp list is written with its elements separated by whitespace, and surrounded by parentheses. Lisp source code is itself comprised of lists.


FACTS

Type of Language: Multi-paradigm: functional, procedural, reflective, meta
Designed by: John McCarthy
Public Release: 1958
License:
Website:


RECOMMENDED OPEN SOURCE BOOKS

Coming soon


OPEN SOURCE SOFTWARE FOR DEVELOPERS

Awesome Common Lisp – A curated list of awesome Common Lisp stuff.


USEFUL RESOURCES

Lisp in Small Parts – This is a series of short Lisp tutorials.
The Common Lisp Cookbook – This is a collaborative project that aims to provide for Common Lisp something similar to the Perl Cookbook published by O’Reilly.
A Brief Guide to CLOS – This is a brief introduction to CLOS that says enough for someone who already knows something about Common Lisp to start using CLOS.
Tutorial for the Common Lisp Loop Macro – The Loop Macro is one of the most valuable, and least-well documented of the operations in Common Lisp.


RECOMMENDED BOOK TO BUY

Practical Common Lisp

PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE PROFILES

Ada, Awk, Assembly, Bash, C, C++, C#, Clojure, CoffeeScript, ECMAScript, Erlang, Forth, Fortran, Go, Haskell, HTML, Java, JavaScript, LaTeX, Lisp, Logo, Lua, OCaml, Pascal, Perl, PHP, Prolog, Python, R, Ruby, Rust, Scala, Scheme, Scratch, SQL, Swift, TeX, VimL